Member Profile : Holly Christman & Max Perr

Today, we invite you to meet (or reconnect) with congregants Holly Christman & Max Perr.

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How long have you been members of Beth Sholom?
Holly & Max: 22 years.

How long have you lived in the Bay Area?
Holly & Max: 37 years.

Where are you from originally?
Holly & Max: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

What kind of work do you do?
Holly: I'm a dermatologist.
Max: I'm a retired corporate executive, and now I'm a private investor.

Do you have any hobbies or other pursuits that are important to you? If so, what?
Holly: I study Italian and art history, and love to travel, cook, read, hike, and exercise.
Max: Wine collecting, cooking, travel, reading, yoga, and spinning.

What’s your favorite movie, book, or album? Why?
Holly: We like too many books to single out any one. As Max is vision impaired, he "reads" his books on Audible.

What’s your most meaningful Jewish memory?
Holly & Max: We have two – when Holly did her conversion and when our children did their b’nai mitzvot!

What, if anything, makes Beth Sholom special for you?
Holly & Max: We have so many memories here:
1) Getting married in the chapel with our dog serving as an attendant, with Rabbi Lew’s permission, of course
2) Rabbi Lew coming to the hospital to bless our first-born, our daughter
3) Munchkins and Mishpacha programs with our children
4) The opening of the new synagogue building
5) Purim festivities

We love the sense of community, of knowing people over the years and watching their kids grow up.

Member Profile : Willy Waks

Today, we invite you to meet (or reconnect) with congregant Willy Waks.

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How long have you been a member of Beth Sholom?
Six years.

How long have you lived in the Bay Area?
Five-and-a-half years now.

Where are you from originally?
France, then Israel, then Dallas. That's the short version, at least!

What kind of work do you do?
I'm retired from my work in IT (Information Technology).

Do you have any hobbies or other pursuits that are important to you? If so, what?
Yes. Road and mountain biking, and also swimming in the Bay (to or from Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge).

What’s your favorite movie, book, or album? Why?
The movie that impressed me most was They Shoot Horses, Don't They?. It's about the plight and injustices inflicted by greed and selfishness.

What’s your most meaningful Jewish memory?
My first son David's bar mitzvah. It was a costume party on Shushan Purim, which can happen only in Jerusalem!

What, if anything, makes Beth Sholom special for you?
Beth Sholom has the right mix of tradition and open mindedness. I enjoy coming and participating in services.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the community?
I already miss Rabbi Glazer. I am sad that he is leaving us.

Photo: Willy is pictured in Dallas, Texas, with his son, David, a Lieutenant in the Dallas Fire Department.

Leilah Goode's Bat Mitzvah

Hello. My name is Leilah Goode. I am a seventh grader at Claire Lilienthal Middle School. I love playing soccer, going to pop concerts, watching movies, and hanging out with my friends in addition to exploring all that San Francisco has to offer.

In Parashat Bo ("Go!"), God commands Moses to "Go to Pharaoh" to continue to plead for the Israelites' freedom. Pharaoh refuses, and his refusal causes additional punishment to befall the Egyptians in the form of three more plagues: locusts, darkness, and, finally, the death of all firstborn Egyptian sons. As the firstborn Egyptians begin to die, Pharaoh relents, and Moses leads the Israelites out of Egypt. Moses proclaims that each year on the evening of the fourteenth day of the first month, a festival lasting seven days will be celebrated in order to recall our freedom from slavery in Egypt.

Freedom, at last. In my d’var Torah, I contemplate the privilege of living in a society founded on freedom, the challenges freedom brings, and the vigilance with which we must protect our liberty. Freedom cannot be taken for granted, even in America.

I would like to thank my tutor, Noa Bar, for all her patience and perseverance in helping me learn my segments of this week’s Shabbat torah service. I would also like to thank Rabbi Glazer and Rabbinic Intern Amanda Russell for familiarizing my havurah with the weekly prayers and reinforcing that there are many acceptable interpretations of our stories. Thanks to my havurah and CBS for being part of a collective journey. And thanks to my family for encouraging me to embrace all aspects of my heritage.

Micah Mangot's Bat Mitzvah

Shalom! My name is Micah Mangot. I am a seventh grader at Herbert Hoover Middle School. I enjoy reading, hanging out with my friends, singing, watching Star Trek: The Next Generation with my family, and swimming.

In Parashat Va'eira, on God's instruction, Moses asks Pharaoh to let the Israelites go. Pharaoh refuses and God turns the water of the Nile into blood, Pharaoh is ready to let the Israelites go but God hardens his heart. This process repeats itself with the plagues of frogs, hordes of insects/wild animals, boils, and burning hail. Parashat Va'eira ends without any real resolution. Since God hardens Pharaoh's heart, the parsha raises a question of restrictions on our freedom. In my D'var Torah, I explore what restrictions there are on our freedom and how that relates to my bat mitzvah.

Becoming a bat mitzvah is a big moment. What is important is not only the actual service and party, but also all of the planning and learning that happens before. As a result of this process, I have learned perseverance and the skill of trope reading. To me, this is just the beginning of my learning and of being a part of the community.

I would like to thank my tutor Noa Bar for helping me learn the Hebrew necessary, Rabbi Glazer for working with me on my D'var Torah, and my family and extended family for supporting me wholeheartedly on this journey. I would also like to express my appreciation to the congregation.

Simon Crosby's Bar Mitzvah

Hello. My name is Simon Crosby.

I’m in seventh grade at A.P. Giannini Middle School. I am in the school band, and I enjoy playing bassoon and trumpet. I also like soccer, disc golf, and tennis.

I’m excited in both an excited way and a nervous way about my bar mitzvah. Preparing for my bar mitzvah has been hard work with a lot of learning and practice. I’ve enjoyed improving my Hebrew, working with my dad most nights, and learning from my tutor, Randy Weiss. I’m so happy that so many of my family are travelling to be with me.

This Thursday and Saturday, I’ll be reading from Parashat Shemot, which covers the early life of Moses. Beginning when Pharaoh orders all Jewish baby boys to be killed, Moses’ mother hides him, and the Pharaoh’s daughter finds him and raises him. Moses then travels to Midian where he encounters the burning bush. G-d speaks to Moses, telling him to free the Jews from Egypt. Moses is scared and hesitates, but eventually returns to Egypt to free the Jews. In studying my parsha, I have learned that it’s okay to be scared - being scared sometimes helps. It can make you take more time to think about what you are doing.

Thank you to Rabbi Glazer, my parents, teachers, my friends, my brother, Daniel, and all of my family for supporting me during this journey.

Raquel Sweet's Bat Mitzvah

My name is Raquel Sweet. I am 13 years old and attend The Brandeis School of San Francisco, where I am in seventh grade. I enjoy swimming, dancing, and playing with my dog, Teddy.

I have belonged to Beth Sholom for my entire life. I have so many memories from the synagogue, from attending PJ Shabbat to celebrating all of the holidays – and, of course, my sister’s bat mitzvah last year.

This week, it will be my bat mitzvah. I will be reading from Parashat Noah. This is the story of Noah and the flood. The parsha also includes the story of the Tower of Babel. What many people don't know about this parsha is that it talks about the first time that people ate meat. Before the time of Noah, no one ate meat - everyone was a vegetarian. I am vegetarian myself, and at my bat mitzvah, I will be talking about reasons we have for making different decisions in life including my deciding to become a vegetarian.

I am so excited to celebrate with everybody this Shabbat. I am very thankful to have all my family and friends coming from near and far to join me. I am also excited to be sharing this occasion with my Beth Sholom family. I look forward to seeing everyone this Shabbat to join me and my family at this simcha.

Michael Ross' Bar Mitzvah

Shalom. My name is Michael Ross. I'm an eighth grader at The Brandeis School of San Francisco and I am becoming a bar mitzvah this Shabbat, 11 Elul 5777.

A bit about me:
I love to play the electric guitar, and have been taking music lessons at The Blue Bear School of Music for six years. My preferred music genre is rock, but I also play jazz in the Brandeis band. I love cars, and am interested in engineering and modern technology/machines, especially computers. I also play tennis.

My parsha is Ki Teitzei. It contains the greatest number of laws of any parsha in the whole Torah – 74, including laws regarding humane treatment of animals and of the most vulnerable members of society, as well as laws curbing animal instincts such as incest and rape, even during war. Some laws address how we are to treat people and their property, and others how we should please and serve God. We are told to keep all of our disputes between people and not involve nature or animals, again even during war. These laws were all meant to raise the Israelites and ultimately the rest of the world from a selfish and brutal state to an elevated state of community and society.

I have family and friends coming from all over the world, and I look forward to sharing this experience with them and with my Beth Sholom community in which I've grown up.

I hope to see you this Shabbat when I become a bar mitzvah, a son of these many commandments!

Zoe & Hana Jaeger Skigen's B'not Mitzvah

Facebook_HanaZoeSkigenShalom. Our names are Zoe and Hana Jaeger Skigen. We are twelve-year-old twins and we just finished Grade 7 at the Synergy School in San Francisco's Mission District, where we also live.

This Shabbat, June 17, we will become b’not mitzvah. We have spent our entire lives doing meaningful things together and the process of preparing to become b’not mitzvah has been one of the highlights. We have been members of Beth Sholom since we were born; we attended "Mommy and Me" and Tot Shabbat programs in addition to the CBS Family Preschool and Shabbat School (religious school). Beth Sholom is literally a "house of peace" for us and our second Jewish home. We are still best friends with the children we met at Beth Sholom from our infancy.

In this week’s parsha, Parashat Shelach Lecha, we learn that Moses sends twelve spies to the land of Canaan as authorized by God. When they return, they bring back incredible things, like enormous grapes, as well as seemingly bad news. Ten of the spies report that the people of the land are unconquerable – that Canaan is filled with giants. Many of the Israelite people panic and want to return to Egypt. As a havruta (learning in pairs), we had lengthy conversations about how and why such conflicting perspectives could emerge about the same land. The process has been both intellectually and spiritually moving for both of us.

I (Zoe) enjoy playing trumpet in a city-wide orchestra and school band. I like all things musical and especially like to teach myself to play new instruments. I am active member of the Gay/Straight Alliance at school and I play on the school basketball team. In my free time, I make videos, arrange music, and I am passionate about tikkun olam and activism. In the summers, I enjoy going to Habonim Dror Camp Gilboa. For my mitzvah project, I taught formerly-imprisoned, mentally ill adults cooking classes.

I (Hana) am on the student council at school, in the school choir, and play on the school futsal, basketball, and cross country teams. I am a proud feminist and activist and I am also a member of the Gay/Straight Alliance. I also have a deep affinity for animals and am an avid reader. I play ukulele and in my free time I enjoy writing songs. For my mitzvah project, I performed a concert at the Jewish Home for the Aged. This is particularly meaningful to me because this is where my great grandmother, Bea, lived and died. Camp Gilboa is a special place in the summer for me as well.

We want to thank our mother and father for supporting us and gently pushing us through the process of becoming b’not mitzvah. We also want to thank our Baba and Savta and our Bubbie, Susan Jaeger, for helping us to develop our Jewish identity. A special thank you to Noa Bar, our tutor, and to Rabbi Glazer for teaching us how to stick with such a large task and the importance of Torah. Most importantly, we would like to thank each other. Having a twin sister always makes life a little easier and we always feel a little safer in the world knowing we have each other.

We are so elated to together share this life cycle event along with our friends and family who are traveling from near and far to witness this simcha!

Gabriel Rogow-Patt's Bar Mitzvah

Facebook_GabrielRogowPattShalom. My name is Gabriel Bram Rogow-Patt. I am in 7th grade at The Brandeis School of San Francisco. I enjoy a good intellectual challenge. I like coding, playing video games with friends, solving puzzles, and learning trivia.

My bar mitzvah is coming up this Shabbat, and I’m excited, but also nervous. I will read from the Torah and then share my thoughts on Parashat Naso with my family, friends, and the congregation. I have learned a lot in the process of becoming a bar mitzvah, including how to read trope, how to study Jewish thought, and how to write a d’var Torah. I have given careful consideration to my own values and those of my family.

To be "bar mitzvah'ed" is to become an adult in the community and take on religious responsibilities. In Parashat Naso, we learn about several ritual practices, including the ritual vows of the nazirites. We also discover the three-fold priestly blessing, which is often given to b'nai mitzvot.

Thank you to Rabbi Glazer for helping me with my d’var Torah. Thank you to Rabbi Jill Cozen-Harel for teaching me to chant my Torah and haftarah, and for also helping me with my d’var Torah. Thank you especially to my family for supporting me all the way.

Ilan Salomon-Jacob's Bar Mitzvah

facebook_ilanShalom, my name is Ilan and I’m in the 8th grade at the San Francisco School. I enjoy playing sports, making videos, composing music digitally, and playing drums on my own or in my band. I also like talking, laughing, and hanging out with friends.

My bar mitzvah is this coming Shabbat and, to be honest, I have a whole swarm of butterflies in my stomach! I am very excited to share this day with my family, friends, and members of the congregation.

I will be chanting Torah from Parashat Beraysheet. In it, God creates the heavens and the Earth, along with all living beings, in six days. God then takes a day of rest. On one of those days, God creates Adam and Eve, the first humans, and puts them in the Garden of Eden. When they disobey God’s orders, they are cast out. They have two children named Cain and Abel who don’t get along so well. Cain is jealous and kills Abel. The parsha ends with a recounting of many generations of descendants, and God is unhappy with the actions of many of them. It finishes on a positive note, however, as God finds hope in a man named Noah.

I would like to thank my family for being supportive throughout this process. I would also like to thank my tutor, Marilyn Heiss, for teaching me how to chant Torah, and Rabbi Glazer for helping me write my d’var Torah. Lastly, I would to thank the Beth Sholom community for always welcoming me and making me feel at home.

Simone Jochnowitz's Bat Mitzvah

Facebook_JochnowitzHello. My name is Simone Jochnowitz. I’m an eighth grader at A.P. Giannini Middle School. My interests include hanging out with my friends, playing trombone in my school band, dancing, and going on walks with my dog. This coming Shabbat, August 27, I will become a bat mitzvah.

My parsha is Ekev, which means "if." In this parsha, Moses tells the people Israel about all the good things that will happen to them IF they follow the laws and commandments that he has taught them. He reminds them about the unfortunate episode involving the Golden Calf, and other evil actions they committed during their 40 years in the desert. Parashat Ekev also contains the famous question, "What does HaShem want?" (The answer: "Follow his ways and do justice.")

I would like to thank my mother and father for teaching me the haftarah and helping me with my speech; Rabbi Glazer for his support; my brother and sisters for their love and encouragement; and the Congregation Beth Sholom community for celebrating this simcha with me and my family.

Let Jane Create The Feast Of Your Dreams!

JaneSykes_KitchenBecause CBS has an on-site kosher kitchen facility with our very own Executive Chef, we are able to create custom menus for Shabbat kiddush luncheons and other catered events. We invite you to work with Executive Chef Jane Sykes to create the feast of your dreams!

Sample menus are available by request, but Jane will even recreate your favorite family recipes. (We know, we know — no one can make rugelach like your bubbe, but we think you’d be surprised how close Jane can get!)

Why sponsor a kiddush? Because it is a thoughtful way to honor a loved one or to mark a life cycle simcha, but any significant event is worthy of celebrating with community: birthdays, anniversaries, yahrzeits, graduations — or maybe you just feel especially great about your latest Candy Crush score.

You can sponsor a kiddush yourself (partial and full sponsorship options are available), or you can “team up” with friends or other families to co-sponsor one. All sponsorship is acknowledged on our printed Kabbalat Shabbat and Shabbat materials and announced during both services.

To learn more about pricing or to inquire about dates and availability, please contact Jane.