Americana Jam Band

AmericanaJamBandAmericana is a cholent – a rich stew – of diverse musical dialects and perspectives, including folk, bluegrass, country, soul, gospel, rock, and more.

Like the Jewish experience, though, Americana’s disparate elements work in unison to create an original sound and story that we recognize as specifically American.

Joan Baez, The Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, The Derailers, The Lone Bellow, and Son Volt – all of these artists and performers are on the same familiar road, searching for a way back home. We are their fellow travelers.

Congregation Beth Sholom invites you to experience the Americana Jam Band Kabbalat Shabbat!

It’s a folk-rock jam session with a Jewish soul, a casual prayer service with country swagger. If you like to sing and/or play an instrument (think piano, guitar, double bass, melodica, harmonica, or vibraphone), pull up a chair and join the jam on select Friday nights in 2017-18. Maybe you won't always play "in the pocket", but that’s not the point – it’s about our journey. Together, we’ll make music in a sacred space and create something new and meaningful as we mark the week’s end and the arrival of Shabbat.

Let's jam on Friday, April 27, 2018! The Americana Jam Band Kabbalat Shabbat service is free.

Member Profile : Holly Christman & Max Perr

Today, we invite you to meet (or reconnect) with congregants Holly Christman & Max Perr.

* * * * *

How long have you been members of Beth Sholom?
Holly & Max: 22 years.

How long have you lived in the Bay Area?
Holly & Max: 37 years.

Where are you from originally?
Holly & Max: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

What kind of work do you do?
Holly: I'm a dermatologist.
Max: I'm a retired corporate executive, and now I'm a private investor.

Do you have any hobbies or other pursuits that are important to you? If so, what?
Holly: I study Italian and art history, and love to travel, cook, read, hike, and exercise.
Max: Wine collecting, cooking, travel, reading, yoga, and spinning.

What’s your favorite movie, book, or album? Why?
Holly: We like too many books to single out any one. As Max is vision impaired, he "reads" his books on Audible.

What’s your most meaningful Jewish memory?
Holly & Max: We have two – when Holly did her conversion and when our children did their b’nai mitzvot!

What, if anything, makes Beth Sholom special for you?
Holly & Max: We have so many memories here:
1) Getting married in the chapel with our dog serving as an attendant, with Rabbi Lew’s permission, of course
2) Rabbi Lew coming to the hospital to bless our first-born, our daughter
3) Munchkins and Mishpacha programs with our children
4) The opening of the new synagogue building
5) Purim festivities

We love the sense of community, of knowing people over the years and watching their kids grow up.

Announcing Valor Grrrls Kabbalat Shabbat !

Kabbalat Shabbat means "welcoming the Sabbath." More specifically, the Jewish mystics conceived of the Friday evening Kabbalat Shabbat service as a welcoming of "the Sabbath bride," the Shechinah, or feminine aspect of the Divine. Our new Valor Grrrls Kabbalat Shabbat musical service celebrates this intrinsic feminine nature of Kabbalat Shabbat by spotlighting the music of female singer-songwriters. Through powerful, deeply-felt lyrics and moving melodies, Joan Armatrading, Natalie Merchant, Gillian Welch, and The Wailin’ Jennys help transport us into this other world we call Shabbat. Their beautiful songs inspire in us a commitment to work for redemption by hearkening to a more just and equitable world.

The format of the Valor Grrrls Kabbalat Shabbat service is also central to the experience. We will sit in-the-round so our voices may join together in a soulful core. This "singing circle" arrangement is inspired by Nava Tehila, the celebrated, Jerusalem-based nonprofit dedicated to the creation of innovative and engaging musical prayer spaces.

Each service is co-led by Rabbi Aubrey Glazer and Rabbinic Intern Amanda Russell, with musical accompaniment.

Join us for Valor Grrrls Kabbalat Shabbat on select Fridays in 2018. We’ll meet at 6 p.m. for a community nosh and the service will start at 6:30 p.m. The service is free, but pre-registration is required – please take a quick minute to sign up below.

Americana Jam Band Returns!

AmericanaJamBandAmericana is a cholent – a rich stew – of diverse musical dialects and perspectives, including folk, bluegrass, country, soul, gospel, rock, and more.

Like the Jewish experience, though, Americana’s disparate elements work in unison to create an original sound and story that we recognize as specifically American.

Joan Baez, The Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, The Derailers, The Lone Bellow, and Son Volt – all of these artists and performers are on the same familiar road, searching for a way back home. We are their fellow travelers.

Congregation Beth Sholom invites you to experience the Americana Jam Band Kabbalat Shabbat!

It’s a folk-rock jam session with a Jewish soul, a casual prayer service with country swagger. If you like to sing and/or play an instrument (think piano, guitar, double bass, melodica, harmonica, or vibraphone), pull up a chair and join the jam on select Friday nights in 2017-18. Maybe you won't always play "in the pocket", but that’s not the point – it’s about our journey. Together, we’ll make music in a sacred space and create something new and meaningful as we mark the week’s end and the arrival of Shabbat.

Let's jam on Friday, March 23, 2018! The Americana Jam Band Kabbalat Shabbat service is free.

Pizza In The Hut (Sukkot Community Dinner)

Sukkot starts this Wednesday evening and the Beth Sholom sukkah is currently being constructed on Eva Gunther Plaza. Time spent in the sukkah is an important aspect of Sukkot – it helps us appreciate the outdoors and annual agricultural cycles, and it gives us an opportunity to come together in community – family, friends, and strangers.

On Tuesday, October 10, at 5:30 p.m., the CBS Family Preschool and Shabbat School families will join the rest of the Beth Sholom community and friends as we gather in our sukkah for the annual community Sukkot dinner, Pizza in the Hut. We'll say the sukkah blessings, shake the lulav, smell the etrog, nosh on pizza, and have a grand ol' time! There will be activities aplenty for the kiddos, and salad, carrots and dip, and dessert will be served in addition to the delicious pizza. It's a BYOB (Bring Your Own Beverage) event, and beverages of all kinds are welcome. We'll sing, learn, laugh, and dine...then dine some more!

Register below! The regular price registration deadline is Monday, October 9. (Day-of walk-ins are welcome, but the prices for adults and children 6–12 increase by $5 each.)

Youth & Family High Holy Days Programming

Web_Ziz1

Congregation Beth Sholom is a stand-out
family destination for the High Holy Days!
CBS offers a selection of age-specific programs and services for children and/or their parents. With the exception of the two free Family Services, a modest donation is requested for each participating child.

FAMILY SERVICES
Our popular and interactive Family Services are designed for families with young children ages newborn – Kindergarten. The services provide an opportunity for children to connect with the rituals, music, and stories of the High Holy Days in a warm and fun context. Older siblings are always welcome. The Family Services this year will feature the engaging and family-friendly Machzor Katan, and occur at 10 a.m. on Rosh Hashanah Day 1 and Yom Kippur. Co-led by Rabbinic Intern Amanda Russell, our CBS Family Preschool Director, and CBS Family Preschool Assistant Director. Featuring musical accompaniment. No tickets are required.

KADIMA KLUB
We’re also pleased to announce Kadima Klub, an exciting new program specifically designed for Jewish students in Grades 6 – 8. Led by David Agam and our USYers, Kadima Klub is engaging and fun. It doesn’t matter whether you know all there is to know about "doing Jewish" or if it’s all just Hebrew to you, Kadima Klub provides a supportive and engaging experience for young Jews of all stripes and knowledge levels, one full of song, art, and learning!

Kadima Klub for Rosh Hashanah Days 1 & 2 and Yom Kippur includes your annual Kadima membership for 2017-18 / 5778 for one low price of $54. If your family is not yet a member of CBS, you are still welcome to join our Kadima chapter; the non-member price is $90. Ain’t that (New Year) sweet! Click here to sign your kid(s) up.

DAYS OF AWESOMENESS
Days of AWEsomeness programming will explore the themes of the High Holy Days through communal prayer, games, storytelling, and music. Days of AWEsomeness is open to children ages newborn – Grade 5.

We are offering six Days of AWEsomeness sessions this year (Erev Rosh Hashanah, Rosh Hashanah Day 1, Rosh Hashanah Day 2, Kol Nidre, Yom Kippur, and Yom Kippur Mincha/Ne'ila) – each session is $25 per child. Click here to see the program details/schedule and to reserve space for your kid(s).

Take Us Out To The Ball Game!

ChristopherOrevReigerNoahPhilippDaleKleisleyKatherineFreidmanBarboniAdinahRatner_SFGiantsJewishHeritageNight_August2016It's that time of the year again!

CBS invites you to join your fellow congregants and other members of the Bay Area Jewish community for San Francisco Giants Jewish Heritage Night on Monday, August 21.


This annual celebration of Jewish identity and heritage is always a home run of fun, and this year the fellas in black and orange need our cheers more than ever! Our beloved Giants are struggling to keep their post-season aspirations alive, and our supportive voices are needed to help Buster, Madison, and company take on a group of Midwestern beer makers (a.k.a., the Milwaukee Brewers) in what may well be an important late-season game.

We'll be sitting in Lower Box Section 135 (Left Field), with an unimpeded view of all the on-field action. This year, as last, we're offering two ticket packages.

The $36 event package includes:
- 1 seat in the CBS section (Lower Box 135 - Left Field) for the game (begins at 7:15 p.m.)
- A collector's-edition, Lou Seal bobble head with a shofar (produced by the SF Giants)
- Admission to the Jewish Heritage Night Pregame Party, 5 - 7 p.m. in Parking Lot A, just across McCovey Cove. (Live entertainment and food/drink specials will be available for purchase during the pregame party, with proceeds partially benefiting local charitable programs in the Jewish community.)

The $50 event package includes:
- All of the above, plus one of our CBS community spirit t-shirts! (See front and back of shirt below. Click on the image to see a larger view.)
Facebook_SFGiantsPromo

ORDER YOUR TICKET(S) BELOW. (Alternatively, you can drop off cash or check in the CBS office. If drop off payment, please email Beth Jones, or call 415.940.7092, to let us know what size t-shirts you would like to reserve. Sizes available are Adult M, L, and XL and Youth XS, S, M, L, and XL.)

Zoe & Hana Jaeger Skigen's B'not Mitzvah

Facebook_HanaZoeSkigenShalom. Our names are Zoe and Hana Jaeger Skigen. We are twelve-year-old twins and we just finished Grade 7 at the Synergy School in San Francisco's Mission District, where we also live.

This Shabbat, June 17, we will become b’not mitzvah. We have spent our entire lives doing meaningful things together and the process of preparing to become b’not mitzvah has been one of the highlights. We have been members of Beth Sholom since we were born; we attended "Mommy and Me" and Tot Shabbat programs in addition to the CBS Family Preschool and Shabbat School (religious school). Beth Sholom is literally a "house of peace" for us and our second Jewish home. We are still best friends with the children we met at Beth Sholom from our infancy.

In this week’s parsha, Parashat Shelach Lecha, we learn that Moses sends twelve spies to the land of Canaan as authorized by God. When they return, they bring back incredible things, like enormous grapes, as well as seemingly bad news. Ten of the spies report that the people of the land are unconquerable – that Canaan is filled with giants. Many of the Israelite people panic and want to return to Egypt. As a havruta (learning in pairs), we had lengthy conversations about how and why such conflicting perspectives could emerge about the same land. The process has been both intellectually and spiritually moving for both of us.

I (Zoe) enjoy playing trumpet in a city-wide orchestra and school band. I like all things musical and especially like to teach myself to play new instruments. I am active member of the Gay/Straight Alliance at school and I play on the school basketball team. In my free time, I make videos, arrange music, and I am passionate about tikkun olam and activism. In the summers, I enjoy going to Habonim Dror Camp Gilboa. For my mitzvah project, I taught formerly-imprisoned, mentally ill adults cooking classes.

I (Hana) am on the student council at school, in the school choir, and play on the school futsal, basketball, and cross country teams. I am a proud feminist and activist and I am also a member of the Gay/Straight Alliance. I also have a deep affinity for animals and am an avid reader. I play ukulele and in my free time I enjoy writing songs. For my mitzvah project, I performed a concert at the Jewish Home for the Aged. This is particularly meaningful to me because this is where my great grandmother, Bea, lived and died. Camp Gilboa is a special place in the summer for me as well.

We want to thank our mother and father for supporting us and gently pushing us through the process of becoming b’not mitzvah. We also want to thank our Baba and Savta and our Bubbie, Susan Jaeger, for helping us to develop our Jewish identity. A special thank you to Noa Bar, our tutor, and to Rabbi Glazer for teaching us how to stick with such a large task and the importance of Torah. Most importantly, we would like to thank each other. Having a twin sister always makes life a little easier and we always feel a little safer in the world knowing we have each other.

We are so elated to together share this life cycle event along with our friends and family who are traveling from near and far to witness this simcha!

This Shavuot: The Kabbalah of Ice Cream

Blog2_KabbalahOfIceCream_posterJoin fellow members of our Bay Area Jewish community for an illuminating night (and dawn!) of learning, rejoicing, and good eats on Tuesday, May 30, and Wednesday, May 31!

Start the evening with a community dinner and post-nosh learning at Congregation Chevra Thilim, then move on to Richmond District staple Toy Boat Dessert Café (for some sweet, edifying licks) before settling in at CBS for our Tikkun Leil Shavuot, an all-night Torah study session established by Jewish mystics.

Check out the full schedule below and join us for some or all of what promises to be an edifying and magical night! Please note that all teaching portions of the evening are free and open to the public, but the community dinner requires a ticketed reservation.

Shavuot Stroll 5777

8 p.m. – Community dinner and davennen (Congregation Chevra Thilim)
If you plan to attend the dinner, please reserve your seats by clicking here.
Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for children 5 and up, and free for children 4 and under.

9 p.m. – Our first taste of learning: Roadmap to Sinai, with Rabbi Shlomo Zarchi (Congregation Chevra Thilim)
10 p.m. – depart from Chevra Thilim

10:30 p.m. – The Kabbalah of Ice Cream (Take 2 scoops!), with Rabbi Shlomo Zarchi & Rabbi Aubrey Glazer (Toy Boat Dessert Cafe)
12 a.m. — depart from Toy Boat

12:30 a.m. — Tikkun Leil Shavuot, all-night study session with Jonathan Bayer, Henry Hollander, Michael Loebs, Rabbi Aubrey Glazer (Congregation Beth Sholom)

First session (12:30–1:30 a.m.)
Falling In Love Again: A Wedding At Sinai (Includes a discussion of David Moss ketubot)
Rabbi Glazer

Second session (1:30–2:30 a.m.)
The Torah in African-American Spirituals: The Many Migrations of the Story of God and the Jewish People
Jonathan Bayer and Henry Hollander in conversation
(w/ performance by Bayer of selected spirituals in the style of Reverend Gary Davis)

Third session (2:30–3:30 a.m.)
Talk by Michael Loebs (title/subject TBD)

Fourth session (3:30–5 a.m.)
The Fantastic Tales of Rabbi Bar Bar Hanna as told in the Talmud and illustrated by Canadian artist Aba Bayevsky
Henry Hollander & Rabbi Glazer
In the midst of an in-depth discussion about terms of sale for ships, the Talmud suddenly decides to blow our minds! Giants, big fish, huge snakes, vast dimensions, circus acts, miracles, and more.

5 a.m. — Shacharit davening, Gronowski Family Chapel (Congregation Beth Sholom)

*****

Please also join the CBS community for Shavuot services on Wednesday, May 31, and Thursday, June 1.

Wednesday, May 31
9 a.m. — Shavuot, 1st Day service
12 p.m. — Shavuot Lunch & Learn Kiddush, Book of Ruth
1:45 p.m. — Mincha Gedolah Shavuot*

*****

Thursday, June 1
9 a.m. — Shavuot, 2nd Day service (with Yizkor memorial service)
12 p.m. — Shavuot Lunch & Learn Kiddush, Book of Ruth
1:45 p.m. — Mincha Gedolah Shavuot*

Our normal, evening minyan service (6 p.m.) is replaced by this 1:45 p.m. service.

Dance The Pain Away

DancingHasidsIt's easy for us to shirk our Jewish responsibility to wrestle with the more challenging and anachronistic aspects of our tradition. In a few weeks, when we read Parashat Vayikra, we'll reconsider the ancient Israelites' sacrificial practices, which seem quite alien to us today. Yet the psychological distance imposed by time and social change doesn't relieve us of our duty to parse and digest the rituals.

Evan Wolkenstein, Director of Experiential Education for American Jewish World Service (and a teacher at the Jewish Community High School of the Bay), writes,

"Nearly 2000 years have passed since the last turtledove’s blood was wrung against the altar walls, and we are still forced to acknowledge that, interesting as they may be, these verses are relevant almost exclusively through creative hermeneutics. We may look to Vayikra for inspiration. We may find its details somewhat disturbing. But no matter our potential discomfort, one thing is certain for all of us—we would never remove these passages from the Torah."

We would never remove the passages because, as Wolkenstein puts it, "none of us is better off by forgetting any part of the past." To the contrary, the past should inform and improve our present; earnest discourse about (and with) the past makes us better Jews and better human beings. Such soul-searching, though, is often uncomfortable, and few Jews outside of our clergy make a regular habit of it. Those who do and who elect to share their ruminations are too often criticized or ignored.

Case in point: every year, a handful of Jewish writers point out that the Purim story has a "a dark and dangerous underside." Invariably, these voices are lambasted and labelled "self-hating" or "naive." In fact, it is the reactionary critics, those who refuse to reside in the uneasy and uncertain space of Purim, who do a grave disservice to our tradition and, importantly, to our future. Lest this seem like a partisan broadside, however, the Jews at the other end of the spectrum – those who refuse to observe or celebrate Purim because they've written it off as a politically incorrect tale of "bloody revenge" (and even attempted genocide by Jews, not of Jews) – are no less misguided.

Two years ago, writing in The Forward, religious studies professor Shaul Magid, allowed as how "Purim is essentially about the celebration of violence." But he doesn't stop there. He doesn't suggest that Purim should wither on the vine or be reduced to a Disney-fied carnival, an intellectually impotent combo of Halloween and Mardi Gras. Instead, he suggests a way forward by sharing a story. How very Jewish of him.

"If you want to approach Purim with a spirit of open-mindedness this year, I’ve got an idea of how to do it. There is a story about blotting out Amalek told in the name of the Hasidic master Zvi Elimelekh of Dinov (1783-1841). I heard the story from Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach (z"l). During the Purim feast, Zvi Elimelekh suddenly stopped the festivities and said, 'Saddle the horses and get the carriages, it is time to blot out Amalek.' His Hasidim were petrified. 'What could the master mean?' Being obedient disciples, they got in their carriages and followed their rebbe. He rode into town to a local inn where the Polish peasants (the Amalekites of his day?) were engaged in their own drunken bash.

The rebbe and his disciples entered the inn. When the peasants saw them, they stopped dancing. The music stopped. Everyone circled around the rebbe and the Jews as they walked to the center of the dance floor. The room was silent. The rebbe looked at one of the peasants and put out his hand with his palm to the ceiling. Silence. The peasants looked at one another. Suddenly one of them stepped forward and took the rebbe’s hand. They slowly started dancing. The musicians began playing. In a matter of minutes, all the Hasidim and peasants were dancing furiously with one another.

You want to blot out Amalek? [...] Reach out your hand. And dance. That is how you blot out Amalek. Crazy? Ask Zvi Elimelekh of Dinov. That is what it means to take Purim seriously.
"

Put another way by David Bowie (z"l),

"Let's dance -- put on your red shoes and dance the blues
[...]
Let's sway -- you could look into my eyes
Let's sway under the moonlight,
this serious moonlight.
"

This year, maybe, we can dance with one another (and with our tradition), warts, disagreements, and all.

VeZot Ha'Berachah -- Deuteronomy 33:1 – 34:12

facebook_coverdesign_vezothaberachahPlease note that Parashat VeZot Ha'Berachah is read during the Simchat Torah service, which will take place on Tuesday, October 25. This Saturday, October 22, is Shabbat Sukkot, during which we read a selection from Parashat Ki Tissa.

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (1907-1972) once remarked: "Zion is in ruins, Jerusalem lies in the dust. All week there is only hope of redemption. But when the Sabbath is entering the world, man is touched by a moment of actual redemption; as if for a moment the spirit of the Messiah moved over the face of the earth."

How is this redemption achieved? For Heschel, redemption takes place through time, not space. "Quality time" is what matters in our lives, and it is through the Jewish calendar that we "do Jewish," embodying Jewish life and identity.

It is precisely through the appointed times (or moadim) on the Jewish calendar that we are best able to define our Jewish lives. We do so by abiding in the sukkah and taking hold of the four species, as well as by participating in the thrice annual pilgrimage festivals to the Jerusalem Temple during Passover, the Feast of Weeks (Shavuot), and Booths (Sukkot).

And when we "Rejoice in the Torah" during Simchat Torah, we simultaneously conclude and begin anew the annual Torah-reading cycle. Firstly, we read the Torah section of Parashat VeZot Ha'Berachah, recounting the Mosaic blessing bestowed upon each of the twelve tribes of Israel before his death. Echoing Jacob's blessings to his twelve sons five generations earlier, Moses empowers each tribe with its individual role within the Israelite community.

What VeZot Ha'Berachah then relates is how Moses ascended Mount Nebo to its summit, taking a peek at the Promised Land without ever entering into it. Moses’ burial place to this day remains unknown and the Torah concludes by attesting that "never again did there arose a prophet in Israel like Moses, whom G-d knew face to face...and in all the mighty hand and the great, awesome things which Moses did before the eyes of all Israel."

As we conclude the annual reading of the Torah, it is important to remember that every moment is a sacred encounter in the making when we truly value the sacral power of time.

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's artwork includes the symbols and colors of the two tribes of Israel that we know survive today (i.e., the tribes that became Jews). The colors and symbols are drawn from Bamidbar Rabbah, part of our rabbinic literature (midrashim). The stones of the choshen, or priestly breastplate, are depicted in white, black, and red here, and represent the Tribe of Levi. The lion depicted on a sky blue ground represents the Tribe of Judah. Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.

It's Americana Jam Band Time!

AmericanaJamBandAmericana is a cholent – a rich stew – of diverse musical dialects and perspectives, including folk, bluegrass, country, soul, gospel, rock, and more. Like the Jewish experience, though, Americana’s disparate elements work in unison to create an original sound and story that we recognize as specifically American. Woody Guthrie, The Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, The Derailers, The Lone Bellow, and Son Volt – all of these artists and performers are on the same familiar road, searching for a way back home. We are their fellow travelers.

Congregation Beth Sholom (CBS) invites you to experience the Americana Jam Band Kabbalat Shabbat! It’s a folk-rock jam session with a Jewish soul, a casual prayer service with country swagger. If you like to sing and/or play an instrument (think piano, guitar, double bass, melodica, harmonica, or vibraphone), pull up a chair and join the jam on select Friday nights in 2016-17. Maybe you won't always play "in the pocket", but that’s not the point – it’s about our journey. Together, we’ll make music in a sacred space and create something new and meaningful as we mark the week’s end and the arrival of Shabbat.

Let's jam on Friday, May 26, at 6:30 p.m.! The Americana Jam Band Kabbalat Shabbat service is free, but pre-registration is required – please take a quick minute to sign up below.

Mark your calendar for all of the Americana Jam Band Kabbalat Shabbat dates:
October 28, November 25, January 27, February 24, March 24, April 28, May 26, June 23, July 28, August 25

Youth & Family High Holy Days Programming

CBS is a stand-out family destination
for the High Holy Days!
PreschoolMural1CBS offers a selection of age-specific programs and services for children and/or their parents. With the exception of the Family Services, a modest donation is requested for each participating child.

If you have any questions, please contact us via email or call 415.940.7092.

FAMILY SERVICES
Our popular and interactive Family Services are designed for families with young children ages 2 – 11. The services provide an opportunity for children to connect with the rituals, music, and stories of the High Holy Days in a warm and fun context. Older siblings are always welcome. The Family Services this year will feature the engaging and family-friendly Machzor Katan, and occur at 8:45 a.m. on Rosh Hashanah Day 1 and Yom Kippur. No tickets are required.

LAUNCH KADIMA 5777
We’re also pleased to announce Launch Kadima 5777, a unique, new program specifically designed for Jewish students in Grades 6 – 8. Led by David Herrera, a charismatic and popular leader among Bay Area youth, Launch Kadima 5777 is an engaging and fun way to kick off the New Year. It doesn’t matter whether you know all there is to know about "doing Jewish" or if it’s all just Hebrew to you, Launch Kadima provides a supportive and engaging experience for young Jews of all stripes and knowledge levels. Just $50 for three days of song, art, learning, and fun – Rosh Hashanah Days 1 & 2 and Yom Kippur – and that price includes your annual Kadima membership! Ain’t that (New Year) sweet! Click here to sign your kid(s) up.

DAYS OF AWESOMENESS
Days of AWEsomeness programming will explore the themes of the High Holy Days through communal prayer, games, storytelling, and music. Days of AWEsomeness is open to children in Kindergarten – Grade 5. Click here to reserve space for your kid(s).

CHILDCARE
Childcare will also be available for children ages newborn – Pre-K during all High Holy Days services. Click here to reserve space for your kid(s).