Ki Tetzei -- Deuteronomy 21:10 – 25:19

German Jewish thinker Hannah Arendt once remarked: "Only crime and the criminal, it is true, confront us with the perplexity of radical evil; but only the hypocrite is really rotten to the core."

How do we discern the difference between hypocrisy and evil? And then how do we confront evil in life? For modern people, it has become habit to dissect evil into two categories: natural evil and moral evil. Hurricanes and toothaches are examples of natural evils whereas murder and lying are examples of moral evils. From the Torah’s perspective, there are those inevitable moments when we confront moral evil of the most radical kind. The symbol of greater moral evil and the need for its effacement – Amalek — serves as the strong conclusion to this week’s Parashat Ki Tetzei reading, yet this awareness of evil also permeates the 74 other laws (of the 613) recorded here that deal with lesser evils.

Lesser evils all focus on the most granular of human interactions, including: eating on the job, proper treatment of a debtor, the prohibition of charging interest on loans, dealing with wayward children, returning lost objects, sending away the mother bird before taking her birdlings, and erecting safety fences around the roof of one’s home. The greater evils emerge on the battlefield, so that the whole notion of whether war is obligatory or optional is also an emergent issue in our sacred text.

While pragmatism is important, Judaism teaches that there is little sense in compromise when it comes to accepting moral evil – rather every seeker is enjoined to always be moving toward the just and the good so as to live with hypocrisy-free integrity.

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's illustration of defaced wheatpaste posters on an urban wall is inspired by Deuteronomy 25:19: "...you shall obliterate the remembrance of Amalek from beneath the heavens. You shall not forget!" This biblical injunction is the basis for three of the 613 mitzvot: Remember what Amalek did to the Israelites; Wipe out the descendants of Amalek; Do not forget Amalek's atrocities and ambush on our journey from Egypt in the desert. If you’re an art aficionado and this portrayal of He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named seems vaguely familiar, it’s because the portrait is a wild-haired riff on one of Austrian artist Egon Schiele’s famous self portraits. Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.

Youth & Family High Holy Days Programming

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Congregation Beth Sholom is a stand-out
family destination for the High Holy Days!
CBS offers a selection of age-specific programs and services for children and/or their parents. With the exception of the two free Family Services, a modest donation is requested for each participating child.

FAMILY SERVICES
Our popular and interactive Family Services are designed for families with young children ages newborn – Kindergarten. The services provide an opportunity for children to connect with the rituals, music, and stories of the High Holy Days in a warm and fun context. Older siblings are always welcome. The Family Services this year will feature the engaging and family-friendly Machzor Katan, and occur at 10 a.m. on Rosh Hashanah Day 1 and Yom Kippur. Co-led by Rabbinic Intern Amanda Russell, our CBS Family Preschool Director, and CBS Family Preschool Assistant Director. Featuring musical accompaniment. No tickets are required.

KADIMA KLUB
We’re also pleased to announce Kadima Klub, an exciting new program specifically designed for Jewish students in Grades 6 – 8. Led by David Agam and our USYers, Kadima Klub is engaging and fun. It doesn’t matter whether you know all there is to know about "doing Jewish" or if it’s all just Hebrew to you, Kadima Klub provides a supportive and engaging experience for young Jews of all stripes and knowledge levels, one full of song, art, and learning!

Kadima Klub for Rosh Hashanah Days 1 & 2 and Yom Kippur includes your annual Kadima membership for 2017-18 / 5778 for one low price of $54. If your family is not yet a member of CBS, you are still welcome to join our Kadima chapter; the non-member price is $90. Ain’t that (New Year) sweet! Click here to sign your kid(s) up.

DAYS OF AWESOMENESS
Days of AWEsomeness programming will explore the themes of the High Holy Days through communal prayer, games, storytelling, and music. Days of AWEsomeness is open to children ages newborn – Grade 5.

We are offering six Days of AWEsomeness sessions this year (Erev Rosh Hashanah, Rosh Hashanah Day 1, Rosh Hashanah Day 2, Kol Nidre, Yom Kippur, and Yom Kippur Mincha/Ne'ila) – each session is $25 per child. Click here to see the program details/schedule and to reserve space for your kid(s).

Ki Tetzei -- Deuteronomy 21:10 – 25:19

Facebook_CoverDesign_KiTetzeiHow do we react to evil when we confront it in our lives?

For modern people, it has become habit to dissect evil into two categories: natural evil and moral evil. Hurricanes and toothaches are examples of natural evils whereas murder and lying are examples of moral evils. From the Torah’s perspective, there are those inevitable moments when we confront moral evil of the most radical kind. The symbol of greater moral evil and the need for its effacement – Amalek — serves as the strong conclusion to this week’s Parashat Ki Tetzei reading, yet this awareness of evil also permeates the 74 other laws (of the 613) recorded here that deal with lesser evils.

Lesser evils all focus on the most granular of human interactions, including: eating on the job, proper treatment of a debtor, the prohibition of charging interest on loans, dealing with wayward children, returning lost objects, sending away the mother bird before taking her birdlings, and erecting safety fences around the roof of one’s home. The greater evils emerge on the battlefield, so that the whole notion of whether war is obligatory or optional is also an emergent issue in our sacred text.

While pragmatism is important, Judaism teaches that there is little sense in compromise when it comes to accepting moral evil – rather every seeker is enjoined to always be moving toward the just and the good.

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's illustration captures the fear that permeates much of the parsha. "...all Israel will listen and fear." (Deuteronomy 21:21) Our ancestors stoned to death wayward children and cut off the hand of a woman who inadvertently touched the "private parts" of a man other her husband – their moral code was clearly a corporeally enforced one. Fortunately, this violence would be reconsidered and tempered by the rabbis. Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.

Youth & Family High Holy Days Programming

CBS is a stand-out family destination
for the High Holy Days!
PreschoolMural1CBS offers a selection of age-specific programs and services for children and/or their parents. With the exception of the Family Services, a modest donation is requested for each participating child.

If you have any questions, please contact us via email or call 415.940.7092.

FAMILY SERVICES
Our popular and interactive Family Services are designed for families with young children ages 2 – 11. The services provide an opportunity for children to connect with the rituals, music, and stories of the High Holy Days in a warm and fun context. Older siblings are always welcome. The Family Services this year will feature the engaging and family-friendly Machzor Katan, and occur at 8:45 a.m. on Rosh Hashanah Day 1 and Yom Kippur. No tickets are required.

LAUNCH KADIMA 5777
We’re also pleased to announce Launch Kadima 5777, a unique, new program specifically designed for Jewish students in Grades 6 – 8. Led by David Herrera, a charismatic and popular leader among Bay Area youth, Launch Kadima 5777 is an engaging and fun way to kick off the New Year. It doesn’t matter whether you know all there is to know about "doing Jewish" or if it’s all just Hebrew to you, Launch Kadima provides a supportive and engaging experience for young Jews of all stripes and knowledge levels. Just $50 for three days of song, art, learning, and fun – Rosh Hashanah Days 1 & 2 and Yom Kippur – and that price includes your annual Kadima membership! Ain’t that (New Year) sweet! Click here to sign your kid(s) up.

DAYS OF AWESOMENESS
Days of AWEsomeness programming will explore the themes of the High Holy Days through communal prayer, games, storytelling, and music. Days of AWEsomeness is open to children in Kindergarten – Grade 5. Click here to reserve space for your kid(s).

CHILDCARE
Childcare will also be available for children ages newborn – Pre-K during all High Holy Days services. Click here to reserve space for your kid(s).