Julian Rapaport's Bar Mitzvah

Shalom, my name is Julian Rapaport. I am a seventh grader at The Brandeis School of San Francisco. People describe me as an "old soul" and I guess they are right. I love playing Beatles records on my new turntable, listening to Mel Brooks2,000 Year Old Man, and following politics. I also play saxophone in the Brandeis Middle School jazz band and a rock band called Another Man Out the Window.

This Saturday, February 17, I will be called to the Torah as a bar mitzvah. At first, I was less than enthused about this – lots of extra work learning the trope and the prayers and, besides, I really didn’t want a party. But that all changed when I started to learn Torah – both how to sing the trope and the meaning in the text. I also realized how special it is for my entire family to be here and watch me carry on the tradition of officially joining the greater Jewish community – at Beth Sholom, in San Francisco, and beyond.

I will be chanting from Parashat Terumah in the Book of Exodus. In this portion, God commands Moses to tell the Israelites to build a Sanctuary. The Sanctuary will house the Torah, as a symbol of God’s presence among the Israelites. God also gives very specific instructions for how the Sanctuary is to be assembled. But interestingly, when God tells Moses how the supplies are to be collected, it sounds pretty vague. God simply tells Moses "have them take for me an offering (a terumah)." I feel that vagueness is symbolic of the Jewish people coming together as a community, by giving whatever they could give to the common goal of building the Tabernacle to God’s specifications.

I want to thank Rabbi Glazer for inspiring me in the writing of my D’var Torah. I also want to thank my grandparents, my mom, my dad, and my brother for all the love and support in getting me to this day. But most of all, I want to thank Scott Horwitz, my bar mitzvah tutor. Scott helped me get excited for this important moment in my life, and helped me learn how to chant Torah and sing all the prayers. His calmness, humor, musical talent, and teaching skill helped guide me through this process.

Member Profile : Willy Waks

Today, we invite you to meet (or reconnect) with congregant Willy Waks.

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How long have you been a member of Beth Sholom?
Six years.

How long have you lived in the Bay Area?
Five-and-a-half years now.

Where are you from originally?
France, then Israel, then Dallas. That's the short version, at least!

What kind of work do you do?
I'm retired from my work in IT (Information Technology).

Do you have any hobbies or other pursuits that are important to you? If so, what?
Yes. Road and mountain biking, and also swimming in the Bay (to or from Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge).

What’s your favorite movie, book, or album? Why?
The movie that impressed me most was They Shoot Horses, Don't They?. It's about the plight and injustices inflicted by greed and selfishness.

What’s your most meaningful Jewish memory?
My first son David's bar mitzvah. It was a costume party on Shushan Purim, which can happen only in Jerusalem!

What, if anything, makes Beth Sholom special for you?
Beth Sholom has the right mix of tradition and open mindedness. I enjoy coming and participating in services.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the community?
I already miss Rabbi Glazer. I am sad that he is leaving us.

Photo: Willy is pictured in Dallas, Texas, with his son, David, a Lieutenant in the Dallas Fire Department.

Simon Crosby's Bar Mitzvah

Hello. My name is Simon Crosby.

I’m in seventh grade at A.P. Giannini Middle School. I am in the school band, and I enjoy playing bassoon and trumpet. I also like soccer, disc golf, and tennis.

I’m excited in both an excited way and a nervous way about my bar mitzvah. Preparing for my bar mitzvah has been hard work with a lot of learning and practice. I’ve enjoyed improving my Hebrew, working with my dad most nights, and learning from my tutor, Randy Weiss. I’m so happy that so many of my family are travelling to be with me.

This Thursday and Saturday, I’ll be reading from Parashat Shemot, which covers the early life of Moses. Beginning when Pharaoh orders all Jewish baby boys to be killed, Moses’ mother hides him, and the Pharaoh’s daughter finds him and raises him. Moses then travels to Midian where he encounters the burning bush. G-d speaks to Moses, telling him to free the Jews from Egypt. Moses is scared and hesitates, but eventually returns to Egypt to free the Jews. In studying my parsha, I have learned that it’s okay to be scared - being scared sometimes helps. It can make you take more time to think about what you are doing.

Thank you to Rabbi Glazer, my parents, teachers, my friends, my brother, Daniel, and all of my family for supporting me during this journey.

Yermiyahu Ramos' Bar Mitzvah

Shalom! My name is Yermiyahu Ramos, but you can call me Yehry. I am a seventhgrader at James Lick Middle School and my favorite subject is Spanish. I love to play all kinds of sports, but I most enjoy playing soccer with my friends after school.

This Saturday, December 9, I will be called to the Torah as a bar mitzvah. The process of becoming a bar mitzvah has been very exciting. Many at Beth Sholom have said to me that they’ve been waiting a long time for my bar mitzvah. I am always at the Shabbat services and enjoy them going to them very much.

For my tzedakah project, all the money I will receive will go the Yad Eliezer project that helps the poor in Israel and the Magen David Adom. For a long time, I’ve wanted to donate to those in need in Israel and my project will finally allow me to do so!

I will be reading Parsha Vayeishev, which talks about Jacob and his family dynamics. It especially focuses on Joseph, who gets his coat of many colors, has his famous dreams, and is sold by his brothers to Ishmaelites that later take him Egypt. The Parasha Vayeishev reading ends with Joseph being sent to jail because of Potiphar’s wife and then interpreting the dreams of Pharaoh's cupbearer and baker.

I want to thank those who have helped me through the process of becoming a bar mitzvah. I also want to thank those who are coming to share a very important moment for me, as well as my family for helping and supporting me.

Adam Zander's Bar Mitzvah

Shalom, my name is Adam Zander and I am a seventh grader at The Brandeis School of San Francisco. My favorite school subject is Social Studies. I love playing basketball and watching sports. I also participate in a musical theater program outside of school.

This Saturday, November 25, I will be called to the Torah as a bar mitzvah. Exactly eight years ago, on the same weekend, my brother, Danny, became a bar mitzvah at Beth Sholom. Coincidentally, I will be reading from the same parsha as he did. I am so happy that Danny will be chanting an aliyah during my bar mitzvah Shabbat.

Becoming a bar mitzvah has been a journey for me, one of appreciating my Jewish background and culture as well as my Jewish education and preparing for my own future. The studying and preparation have been intense, especially when I try to fit it into all my other activities, but going through this process has given me the opportunity to give back. For my tzedakah project, I chose to volunteer with the Food Bank and cook and deliver meals with the Chicken Soupers program at Beth Sholom. For a long time now, I have felt it was important to help needy people get food; I started volunteering at the Food Bank in second grade. I recently started to bring my apron to Beth Sholom on Sunday mornings and deliver meals in the afternoon to the ill and disabled. Even though the last part always makes me sad, it is truly satisfying work.

I will be chanting from Parsha Vayeitzai in Bereshit (Book of Genesis), which recounts Jacob’s journey from Beer Sheba, the land of his father, the biblical patriarch, Isaac, to Haran, to stay with his uncle, Laban. He leaves a young man, often scared and mistrusting. He has an encounter with G-d in a dream in which G-d grants him lifelong protection. There is a question as to whether Jacob can handle this particular blessing. He labors many years for his uncle, marries his daughters Rachel and Leah, albeit in a different order than he intended, fathers many children, and returns to Beer Sheba a man, with a wealth of animals and riches.

I want to thank Randy Weiss for teaching me how to chant Torah and Rabbi Glazer for inspiring me in the writing of my D’var Torah. I also want to thank Henry Hollander for guiding us through the process and orchestrating everything behind the scenes. I especially want to thank my grandparents, parents, and brother for all the love and support in getting me to this day.

Michael Ross' Bar Mitzvah

Shalom. My name is Michael Ross. I'm an eighth grader at The Brandeis School of San Francisco and I am becoming a bar mitzvah this Shabbat, 11 Elul 5777.

A bit about me:
I love to play the electric guitar, and have been taking music lessons at The Blue Bear School of Music for six years. My preferred music genre is rock, but I also play jazz in the Brandeis band. I love cars, and am interested in engineering and modern technology/machines, especially computers. I also play tennis.

My parsha is Ki Teitzei. It contains the greatest number of laws of any parsha in the whole Torah – 74, including laws regarding humane treatment of animals and of the most vulnerable members of society, as well as laws curbing animal instincts such as incest and rape, even during war. Some laws address how we are to treat people and their property, and others how we should please and serve God. We are told to keep all of our disputes between people and not involve nature or animals, again even during war. These laws were all meant to raise the Israelites and ultimately the rest of the world from a selfish and brutal state to an elevated state of community and society.

I have family and friends coming from all over the world, and I look forward to sharing this experience with them and with my Beth Sholom community in which I've grown up.

I hope to see you this Shabbat when I become a bar mitzvah, a son of these many commandments!

Gabriel Rogow-Patt's Bar Mitzvah

Facebook_GabrielRogowPattShalom. My name is Gabriel Bram Rogow-Patt. I am in 7th grade at The Brandeis School of San Francisco. I enjoy a good intellectual challenge. I like coding, playing video games with friends, solving puzzles, and learning trivia.

My bar mitzvah is coming up this Shabbat, and I’m excited, but also nervous. I will read from the Torah and then share my thoughts on Parashat Naso with my family, friends, and the congregation. I have learned a lot in the process of becoming a bar mitzvah, including how to read trope, how to study Jewish thought, and how to write a d’var Torah. I have given careful consideration to my own values and those of my family.

To be "bar mitzvah'ed" is to become an adult in the community and take on religious responsibilities. In Parashat Naso, we learn about several ritual practices, including the ritual vows of the nazirites. We also discover the three-fold priestly blessing, which is often given to b'nai mitzvot.

Thank you to Rabbi Glazer for helping me with my d’var Torah. Thank you to Rabbi Jill Cozen-Harel for teaching me to chant my Torah and haftarah, and for also helping me with my d’var Torah. Thank you especially to my family for supporting me all the way.

Elai Levinson's Bar Mitzvah

Facebook_ElaiLevinsonShalom. My name is Elai David Levinson, and I will be called up to read from the Torah as a bar mitzvah this Shabbat, May 6.

I am a 7th grader at Claire Lilienthal Alternative School. During my free time, I can be found drawing, writing, editing my movies, drumming with my band, Planet 17, and reading. Some of my favorite subjects to draw are maps, political figures, stadiums, landscapes, and monsters. My interests include politics, geography, comedy, history, film, religion, and more.

Throughout the year, I have been studying my double parshiyot, Acharei Mot and Kedoshim, with my tutor, Noa Bar, as well as with Rabbi Glazer and many more. Both parshiyot are from the Book of Leviticus (Vayikra). Acharei Mot is about Aaron purifying the people by sacrificing a goat, and sending the other goat to Azazel, as a scapegoat. This parsha is also where the term “scapegoat” originates from. In Kedoshim, G-d demands that Israel will be holy, and demands the people also be holy.

I would like to thank my parents, Rami and Vered, for guiding me along on this extraordinary journey of becoming a bar mitzvah and participating in the tradition of my ancestors. I would also like to thank my sister, Yarden, for always being there for comfort and company. Additionally, I thank my many relatives and friends in Israel and the U.S. Next, I would like to thank Henry Hollander, for always being supportive and friendly, and Noa Bar, my tutor, for being such a wonderful teacher and helping me learn to leyn my parshiyot in a relatively short amount of time. Lastly, I would like to thank Rabbi Glazer for inspiring me and helping me understand my parshiyot.

Todah Rabah v’Shalom.

Nicholas Miller's Bar Mitzvah

Facebook_NicolasMillerHi, or שלום (Sholom)!

My name is Nicholas (Nick) Miller and I’m a 7th grader at San Francisco Friends School. I am a second generation San Franciscan and a third generation member of Beth Sholom. My favorite things are playing sports or video games, spending time outdoors or with family and friends, and making art when I have an inspiration.

On April 29, I will be called to the Torah, a huge milestone in my life. As I have spent lots of time preparing for my big day, I have come to be aware of my place in my Jewish community.

In this week’s combined parsha, Tazria-Metzora, we learn how to deal with tzara’at (skin distortion). At the time, Aaron was the priest and the one making the decision about whether someone was pure (tahor) or impure (tameh). Aaron could tell if someone was impure if the person had any skin distortion. These people were identified, in public, as being impure because they didn’t fit in with the expected norm and then were forced out of the camp. These people would then have to follow very strict rules to become pure again.

I want to thank my mom and my dad for pushing me to get my work done and helping me out when I was challenged. I want to thank my family and friends, especially my sister, for supporting me. I want to thank Rabbi Glazer for helping me choose my Hebrew name as well as teaching me how to relate to the Torah. Thank you to Noa Bar for her dedication, hard work, and teaching me how to read Torah. Lastly, I want to thank Henry Hollander, who has selflessly volunteered innumerable hours to make sure that this day happened.

Noah Eshaghpour-Silberman's Bar Mitzvah

Facebook_NoahEshaghpour-SilbermanHello! Salam!

My name is Noah Eshaghpour-Silberman. On March 11th, I will celebrate the milestone of becoming a bar mitzvah in front of the Beth Sholom community.

I am a 7th Grader at Presidio Middle School, and my many interests include cooking, performing, musical theater, fashion, design, and art exhibits.

In this week’s Torah portion, Parashat Tetzaveh, God commands that a lamp called the ner tamid ("eternal light") burn all night in the Mishkan. The priests are then ordered to wear holy garments, and God provides direction for the scared preparations into priesthood and prescribes the sacrificial duties. The parsha concludes with the making of the incense-burning golden altar.

I want to thank my parents, Rabbi Glazer, my tutor, Noa Bar, and all of my teachers at Beth Sholom for helping me prepare for this day.

I hope to see you this weekend as I celebrate my bar mitzvah with friends and family!

Arlo Novicoff's Bar Mitzvah

Facebook_ArloNovicoffShalom, my name is Arlo Novicoff. I’m a 7th grader at A.P. Giannini Middle School. In my free time, I like to play sports and hang out in the city with my family and friends. I’m interested in traveling, good food, history, and math. This coming Shabbat, February 11, I will become a bar mitzvah.

In my parsha, Beshalach, Pharaoh frees the Israelites and they journey to the Promised Land. As they approach the Red Sea, Pharoah regrets his decision to release them and commands his army to bring the Israelites back as slaves. With Pharaoh's army behind them, the Israelites cry out to God and fear that they will be captured. Moses reassures the Israelites of God’s support by splitting the Red Sea, and they all cross to safety. Although the Israelites are now free, their journey is far from over. They face new challenges along the way, like lack of food, lack of water, and lack of confidence in themselves. Moses once again reassures the Israelites and God provides for them. As we conclude the parsha, the Amalekites attack the vulnerable Israelites and Joshua leads a small army to defend them.

I want to recognize my family who have supported me on this exciting journey. I would like to thank my bar mitzvah tutor, Noa Bar, for teaching me to chant Torah and haftarah trope and to Rabbi Glazer for helping me to prepare my d’var Torah - the discussions and focus were much appreciated. Thank you to Judy and the Chicken Soupers team, who welcomed me during my volunteer days in the CBS kitchen over the course of this past year – it has really opened me up to the realities some elderly people face in our city. Lastly, I’d like to thank the entire CBS community for being there for me from preschool until now. I look forward to seeing many of you next week at CBS!

Myles Sloan's Bar Mitzvah

facebook_mylessloanShalom! My name is Myles and I am in 7th grade at the Brandeis School of San Francisco. I like to read, hang out with my friends, play video games, rock climb (both indoors and outdoors), and ski.

I am excited and a little nervous to share my bar mitzvah with my family, friends, and the Beth Sholom community.

The parsha that I will be chanting is one that everyone, no matter their religion or age, knows - Parashat Noach. In it, G-d tells Noah that he's the only righteous man left. He instructs him to build an ark and to fill it with two of every animal. G-d floods the earth for forty days and forty nights. Noah then sends out a dove to find dry land where mankind and the animals can start again. After many generations, Noah's descendants multiply and build the Tower of Babel. G-d sees this as an act of hubris and knocks down the tower. G-d also scatters their languages, hence the name, Tower of Babel (from the Hebrew word balal, meaning "to jumble.").

I would like to thank my parents for giving me their unconditional love and support. I would also like to thank Marilyn Heiss, my bar mitzvah tutor, for teaching me how to chant Torah so beautifully. I would like to thank Rabbi Glazer for helping me write my drash and for our interesting discussion. And thank you to my Congregation Beth Sholom community for being part of my life since I was born.

Ilan Salomon-Jacob's Bar Mitzvah

facebook_ilanShalom, my name is Ilan and I’m in the 8th grade at the San Francisco School. I enjoy playing sports, making videos, composing music digitally, and playing drums on my own or in my band. I also like talking, laughing, and hanging out with friends.

My bar mitzvah is this coming Shabbat and, to be honest, I have a whole swarm of butterflies in my stomach! I am very excited to share this day with my family, friends, and members of the congregation.

I will be chanting Torah from Parashat Beraysheet. In it, God creates the heavens and the Earth, along with all living beings, in six days. God then takes a day of rest. On one of those days, God creates Adam and Eve, the first humans, and puts them in the Garden of Eden. When they disobey God’s orders, they are cast out. They have two children named Cain and Abel who don’t get along so well. Cain is jealous and kills Abel. The parsha ends with a recounting of many generations of descendants, and God is unhappy with the actions of many of them. It finishes on a positive note, however, as God finds hope in a man named Noah.

I would like to thank my family for being supportive throughout this process. I would also like to thank my tutor, Marilyn Heiss, for teaching me how to chant Torah, and Rabbi Glazer for helping me write my d’var Torah. Lastly, I would to thank the Beth Sholom community for always welcoming me and making me feel at home.

Max Billick's Bar Mitzvah

facebook_maxbillickMy name is Max Billick, I’m a seventh-grader at The Brandeis School of San Francisco. I’m interested in politics, history, constitutional law, world languages, Talmud, and cooking.

This Shabbat – on the fourth day of Sukkot Chol HaMoed – I will be called to the Torah as a bar mitzvah. On the occasion of my bar mitzvah, I will be recognized as a member of this community and brought into the covenant.

On Shabbat Chol HaMoed Sukkot we will be reading from Parashat Ki Tissa. In the parsha, G-d commands Moses to conduct a census. After the census, G-d gives two tablets to Moses on which Moses inscribes the Ten Commandments. Meanwhile, the Israelites decide to make a golden calf. G-d is displeased about this but Moses is able to convince G-d to not forsake the covenant. When Moses saw this for himself, he was enraged and broke the tablets. He pleaded with G-d again not to forsake the covenant, and again carved tablets that he inscribed the Ten Commandments upon.

I want to thank my tutor Noa Bar, for helping me prepare for my bar mitzvah, and Rabbi Glazer for his invaluable help in preparing my d’var Torah.

Miles Kessler's Bar Mitzvah

MilesKessler

MilesKessler

My name is Miles Kessler, and I am a 7th grader at Roosevelt Middle School. I enjoy playing board games like Monopoly along with strategic games like chess and Risk. I also enjoy playing World War II video games, engineering, model railroading, and playing jazz on my tenor saxophone.

I am very excited about my bar mitzvah this coming Shabbat, but, to tell you the truth, I'm also pretty terrified! The Torah portion will be Parashat Chukat. The manuscript outlines the laws of purity, that is, how one becomes impure, and instructions on how to purify those who are impure. It then chronicles Moses' mistake (when he struck, rather than spoke, to a rock to get water for the parched Israelites), and the history of what happened next.

I cannot wait to share this day with my friends, Greg and Colin, family, and all the members of the minyan, and I hope you find it enlightening.

I would like to thank my mom and dad for pushing me on when I got stuck and teaching me the value of commitment; my tutor, Stuart, for teaching me how to do get the job done along with the value of learning; Rabbi Glazer, for giving me the gift of Torah study and instructing me on the value of spirituality; the weekday minyan, for showing me how to read the Torah and teaching me the value of tolerance; and all the previous b'nai mitzvahs during the last school year, for exposing me to this process and teaching me the value of passing on knowledge as a side effect of your own learning process.

Max Lederman's Bar Mitzvah

Facebook_MaxLedermanShalom! My name is Max Lederman and I am entering 9th grade at the Lycée Français de San Francisco. So, yes, I am fluent in French and working on Spanish and Latin.

I’m an avid soccer player and have been playing since I was a toddler. You’ve probably seen me in synagogue in one of my soccer jerseys! I play on a competitive travel team and practice several times a week. But I also love baseball, basketball, and football. Beyond sports, I can be found reading history or science fiction, playing video games or watching TV. I also love spending time with my family and am excited to have them by my side when I am called to Torah.

I have been preparing for my bar mitzvah for a whole year now, and in only a few days the wait will be over! I have learned a lot over this past year about my history and myself. I will be reading from Parashat Korah, which is found in the Book of Numbers. The parsha is full of blood, as G-d and Moshe (Moses) must confront Korah, the leader of a rebellion. Although many die by the hand of G-d in this parsha, we also learn of G-d’s peaceful side when Aaron’s staff blooms.

Thank you, Mom and Dad, for helping me on this wild ride with my sister by my side. Thank you, Rabbi Glazer, for teaching me about the Torah, especially my parsha, Korah. And thank you to my tutor, Marilyn, for helping me study blessings and giving me haftarah and Torah lessons.

Jacob Goode's Bar Mitzvah

JacobGoodeI’m Jacob Goode, a seventh grader at Claire Lilienthal in San Francisco. I enjoy learning, playing baseball and golf, watching the Giants and Warriors, hanging out with my friends and playing video games, and traveling the world with my family. In fact, my family and I have recently returned from a trip to Israel, which has helped put my bar mitzvah in perspective. I have a greater appreciation for our long history.

I am very excited that this Shabbat is my bar mitzvah. This week’s Torah portion is Parashat Emor. The text outlines the Jewish festivals, holy days, and some of the Jewish laws and rituals. Parashat Emor concludes by describing an incident in which a man is accused of blasphemy. The text then provides the principle of lex talionis, "ayin tachat ayin, shein tachat shein" (literally, an "eye for an eye; tooth for a tooth"). I’m looking forward to sharing this day with friends, family, and members of the community, whom I hope shall end Shabbat with good sight and fully dentured.

I’d like to thank my amazing tutor, Noa, who helped me learn this week’s haftarah, the maftir for this week’s Torah portion, the blessings before and after the readings, and the Torah service in such a short time. I’d also like to thank our B'nai Mitzvah Chavurah for their support and friendship. I’d like to thank Rabbis Glazer and Hyman, and my CBS Shabbat School teacher, Elizabeth Andrews. And a very special thanks to my family (the Chikhanis and the Goodes), for being there every step of the way, for always supporting me, encouraging me, and schlepping me to where I wanted to be.

Joseph Neyman's Bar Mitzvah

JosephNeymanBarMitzvahphotoShalom! My name is Joseph Neyman. I am a seventh grade student at the Brandeis School in San Francisco. Just like every teenage guy, I love sports. My favorites are skateboarding, swimming, soccer, skiing, and water polo. I also enjoy video games and hanging out with my friends. When I’m not doing any of these or in school, I spend time with my parents watching movies, eating out, and doing non-fun teenager stuff like reading.

Over the many months that I have been studying for my bar mitzvah, I have learned valuable skills like not giving up easily, managing my time effectively, and having lots of patience. I have grown to enjoy practicing for my special day. I think that my bar mitzvah is not only about chanting the Torah and leading services, but also about receiving a greater role in the Jewish community and learning the responsibilities of being an adult. Last year, I joined the Youth Tzedek program at SF Jewish Family and Children’s Services, which has workshops about leadership and values. But more important than those were the opportunities I had to help families who are in need by putting together supplies and necessities, preparing meals, and helping to deliver goods each Jewish holiday.

This week I will be sharing an extremely special day with my friends, family, and the Beth Sholom community. I will be called up to the Torah to become an adult. I will be reading from Parashat Tazria. My parsha is about the laws related to a leprous skin disease called tza’arat. Even if this parsha talks about ancient skin disease that no longer affecting us, the core message is still relevant in our modern world. I hope you can join us this Shabbat.

A big thank you to Rabbi Glazer for helping me understand my parsha and for helping me with my drash, and to Marilyn Heiss, my teacher, for teaching me trope, and to my parents who are always there for me.

Aidan Swan's Bar Mitzvah

DSC_0111Hello, my name is Aidan Swan. I am a seventh grader at the Brandeis School of San Francisco. I enjoy sports, and my favorites are basketball, baseball, golf, and rock climbing. I also like to watch the Warriors and Giants, hang out with my friends, and travel. I am very excited that this Shabbat is my bar mitzvah and my parsha is Ki Tissa. I’m looking forward to sharing this day with friends, family, and members of the congregation.

My portion is filled with mistakes and lessons. Moses goes up Mount Sinai to talk to G-d and, while he is gone, the people make a golden calf to worship. When Moses comes back and sees what has happened, he is so angry that he smashes the tablets G-d has just presented him with. So much more happens, but you'll need to come on Saturday if you want to hear about it!

I have loved studying for my bar mitzvah. Thank you to Rabbi Glazer for being a great help in understanding my parsha and helping me write my drash. Thank you to my amazing tutor, Batshir, who helped me learn my haftarah and Torah portions and made studying a great experience. Thank you to my family for being there every step of the way, and for always supporting me and encouraging me.

Evan Fox's Bar Mitzvah

EvanFox_2Shalom.

My name is Evan Fox. I am a seventh grader at Presidio Middle School. My favorite subjects are Physical Education (P.E.) and Language Arts. I enjoy playing soccer, tennis, and drums. I also like listening to music, cooking, and playing Minecraft.

My bar mitzvah is coming up, and I’m excited to share the special day with my family and friends. I think of a bar mitzvah as a day where I become a Jewish adult. I will become a devoted member of the community.

My parshat is Yitro. Yitro is so important, because it is when the Ten Commandments are shown to the Israelites. People may think Yitro is all about the Ten Commandments, but that’s only half of it. Moses was under a ton of pressure while judging the Israelites. Yitro, his father-in-law, helped release quite a bit of pressure off of Moses. Pressure (and its pros and cons) are the other part of Yitro.

I would like to thank my tutor, Randy Weiss, for teaching me trope, my maftir, and my haftarah. I would also like to thank Rabbi Glazer for helping me construct my d’var Torah. And, of course, I would like to thank my family for showing me support and helping me get prepared.

See you on the 30th!