Vayigash — Genesis 44:18 – 47:27

Great change happens with the smallest of steps. That change is captured poignantly in this week’s opening verse, when Judah selflessly pleads for the release of his brother, Benjamin: "Then Judah went up to [Joseph] and said: 'Please, my lord…'" (Genesis 44:18).

This is the dramatic moment where Judah is called upon to facilitate the role of rapprochement as he approaches Joseph. This act of loyalty amidst a history of loyalties betrayed is so heart-wrenching that Joseph, the governor of Egypt, finally pushes aside his seeming disinterestedness to reveal his true identity to his astonished brothers. Shame and remorse overcome the brothers, but Joseph comforts them, explaining the divine hand in this drama.

Rushing back to Canaan with the joyous news, the brothers inform Jacob that his favorite son, Joseph, is still alive. They all return to Egypt with their families – seventy souls in all — and the bereft father is reunited with his favorite son after 22 years apart.

Joseph continues to prosper as governor of Egypt, selling stored food and seed during the famine. As a result, Pharaoh awards Jacob’s family the entire country of Goshen as a place to settle, so that the blessing of assimilation continues for the Israelites amidst their apparent Egyptian exile.

Redemption from exile is a process of inner change and transformation. If we take the advice of Judah, we can each find a pathway to self-transformation [teshuvah] by walking in his footsteps, one small step at a time!

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's illustration depicts the land of Goshen, the fecund portion of Egypt's Nile delta in which Joseph's family settles when they moved south. Vayigash is the penultimate parsha in Bereshit (Genesis), and it draws to a close on a pastoral climax, with our ancestors secure in a new land and "prolific." Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.

Vayigash — Genesis 44:18–47:27

facebook_coverdesign_vayigashSometimes the harshest reproach can elicit the most tender response. "Then Judah went up to [Joseph] and said: 'Please, my lord…'" (Genesis 44:18).

This is the dramatic moment where Judah is called upon to facilitate the role of rapprochement as he approaches Joseph. This act of loyalty amidst a history of loyalties betrayed is so heart-wrenching that Joseph, the governor of Egypt, finally pushes aside his seeming disinterestedness to reveal his true identity to his astonished brothers. Shame and remorse overcome the brothers, but Joseph comforts them, explaining the divine hand in this drama.

Rushing back to Canaan with the joyous news, the brothers inform Jacob that his favorite son, Joseph, is still alive. They all return to Egypt with their families – seventy souls in all — and the bereft father is reunited with his favorite son after 22 years apart.

Joseph continues to prosper as governor of Egypt, selling stored food and seed during the famine. As a result, Pharaoh awards Jacob’s family the entire country of Goshen as a place to settle, so that the blessing of assimilation continues for the Israelites amidst their apparent Egyptian exile. How much does our own self-interest dictate the level of our connection to the spaces we occupy and the relationships we cultivate?

Tenderness can re-emerge amidst the challenges of any reproach if our hearts are truly open.

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's digital illustration was inspired by the weeping Joseph and his brothers do when he finally reveals his identity to them. "And he wept out loud, so the Egyptians heard, and the house of Pharaoh heard." (Genesis 45:2) These are tears of joyful reunification, profound shame, betrayal, and release – complex and contradictory emotions. This illustration of an eye calls to mind pooled water (or tears), but also reflects Joseph's watchfulness and calculation. Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.

Aaron Miller's Bar Mitzvah

Miller2This Shabbat, we hope you'll join CBS as we celebrate Aaron Miller's bar mitzvah!

Aaron's message for the community is below.

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Hello, my name is Aaron Miller. I am a seventh grader at the Brandeis School of San Francisco. I like to play soccer, work with computers, read, and be with my younger brothers, Joshua and Ilan. Soon it will be my bar mitzvah, and my portion is Vayigash.

In Vayigash, Joseph is now the second in command to Pharaoh. Joseph’s brothers go to him for food because there is a famine in Egypt, not knowing that he is their brother. Joseph tells them to go get their youngest brother (Benjamin), or he will not give them food. They bring Benjamin to Joseph, and Joseph reveals himself as the brother whom they assumed to be dead. Joseph gives them food and money for the famine.

The famine hits the Egyptian people, and Joseph sells food to them. He takes their money, land, and cattle. Then the people offer themselves as payment, making them slaves to Pharaoh in exchange for food. Joseph makes them slaves, but he also gives them seeds so that the people can plant their own fields when the famine is over. They will then have to give one-fifth of their food to Pharaoh during the harvest.

I am donating money to MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger, because my portion makes you think about what people do in order to get food, and I want to help prevent that. I am also collecting food to donate to the JFCS food pantry. I feel that food scarcity is a big problem in the world today, and I want to do what I can to help fix it.

Thank you to my amazing tutor Marilyn, who helped me learn my Torah and Haftarah. Thank you to Rabbi Glazer for being a great teacher and rabbi. Thank you to my family, who listened to me practice my drash over and over, and who are always positive.

Please note that any JFCS food pantry donations should be dropped off at CBS before or after Shabbat. Bins are located in the Rainbow Courtyard, behind the stairs, and near the CBS Family Preschool entrance off 15th Avenue. Thank you for participating in this mitzvah!

Vayigash -- Genesis 44:18-47:27

800px-Pindar_statueBorn to an aristocratic family near Thebes in or about 522 BCE, Pindar is considered by some scholars to be the greatest of the classical Greek poets. He once wrote that:

Even wisdom has to yield to self-interest."

But where does one draw the line?

Namely, how much self-interest inheres in Judah’s seemingly selfless pleading for the release of brother, Benjamin? This is that dramatic moment where Judah is called upon to facilitate the role of rapprochement as he approaches Joseph. It is this very act of loyalty amidst a history of loyalties betrayed that is so heart-wrenching, to the point where Joseph, the governor of Egypt, finally pushes aside his seeming disinterestedness to reveal his true Jewish identity to his brothers. Shame and remorse overcome the brothers, but Joseph comforts them, explaining the divine hand in this drama.

Rushing back to Canaan with the joyous news, Jacob is informed that his favorite son, Joseph, is still alive. They all return to Egypt with their families—seventy souls in all — and the bereft father is reunited with his favorite son after 22 years apart.

Joseph continues to prosper as governor of Egypt, selling stored food and seed during the famine. As a result, Pharaoh awards Jacob’s family the entire country of Goshen as a place to settle, so that the blessing of assimilation continues for the Israelites amidst their apparent Egyptian exile. How much does our own self-interest dictate the level of our connection to the spaces we occupy and the relationships we cultivate? And where then can wisdom be found?

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Image credit: Bust of the poet Pindar, Roman copy from original of the mid-5 century BC; collection of Napoli, Museo Archeologica Nazionale.