Zinnia Estes' Bat Mitzvah

ZinniaEstes-990x1024.jpg

Shalom! My name is Zinnia Estes. I am just finishing 7th grade at Presidio Middle School. My Bat Mitzvah has been a stressful, crazy, exciting process. I can’t believe I was three when I first entered the Congregation Beth Shalom community as a preschooler. After preschool, I started going to Hebrew school every week and Kabbalat Shabbat once a month. This past year, I have been studying for my big day, aka my Bat Mitzvah.

Besides Hebrew school and Bat Mitzvah prep, I have a pretty busy life. I also enjoy surfing, skating, and playing trumpet, piano, and ukulele. Oh, let's not forget my most important hobby--playing with my puppy, Django!

At first when I started working on my Bat Mitzvah I must admit I had a bad attitude about it. However, I came to like it more and more. I started to think about how cool it was that I was learning a new language. I also thought about how lucky I am to have this experience. Many generations of women before me could not have this experience and some still can’t. As I studied and prepared I was inspired to do a good job for myself and for all those who won’t have this opportunity. I also learned that hard work pays off. I know I’m going to look back on this experience and be proud of my accomplishments.

My parsha is Beha'alotecha, which translates to "when you rise up." The parsha covers a lot of material, but in general describes the Israelites’ journey through the desert. When I step up to the Torah I will be thinking about the many journeys of Jewish people that came before me.

There are a lot of people that I would like to thank. I first want to thank Rabbi Glazer and Noa Bar for helping me learn and prepare for my Bat Mitzvah. I want to thank my family and friends who are coming to the service to support me. Thank you to my parents for helping to make my Bat Mitzvah a great day.

Beha'alotecha – Numbers 8:1 - 12:16

How does ritual allow for the building of community practice?

Ongoing commitment to communal ritual requires trust. Another key for community building I learned from Dr. Sarale Shadmi-Wortman (Oranim College of Education) while on the Rabin Bay Area Leadership Mission to Israel is mutual trust. It is defined as the "willingness of individuals to join and help others without deep personal familiarity nor with any expectation, just the conviction that this is what other members of a community are doing, so I will do it, too."

In Parashat Beha'alotecha, as Aaron is commanded to light the lamps of the menorah, the focus is on just how to raise the sparks to create a luminous presence. For those Israelites unable to bring the Paschal offering at the appointed time, there is another chance with the institution of a Second Passover. Also, dissatisfaction with the manna from heaven sets in as the Israelites yearn for new tastes.

Each of these scenarios involves an initial enthusiasm that fades, so that the challenge remains how to hold onto that inspiration through a daily spiritual practice. The mosaic wisdom here is instructive, specifically in imparting his (Moses') spirit to the appointed seventy elders. Spiritual practice is bolstered in a community of practice where mutual trust is a given.

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's artwork depicts "the cloud of the Lord" that leads the Israelites through their years of desert wandering. "Whether it was for two days, a month, or a year, that the cloud lingered to hover over the Mishkan, the children of Israel would encamp and not travel, and when it departed, they traveled." (Numbers 9:22) Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.

Beha'alotecha – Numbers 8:1 - 12:16

Facebook_CoverDesign_BehaAlotechaHow does ritual allow for the building of community practice?

Ongoing commitment to communal ritual requires trust. Another key for community building I learned from Dr. Sarale Shadmi-Wortman (Oranim College of Education) while on the Rabin Bay Area Leadership Mission to Israel is Mutual Trust: The "willingness of individuals to join and help others without deep personal familiarity nor with any expectation, just the conviction that this is what other members of a community are doing, so I will do it, too."

In Parashat Beha'alotecha, as Aaron is commanded to light the lamps of the menorah, the focus is on just how to raise the sparks to create a luminous presence. For those Israelites unable to bring the Paschal offering at the appointed time, there is another chance with the institution of a Second Passover. Also, dissatisfaction with the manna from heaven sets in as the Israelites yearn for new tastes.

Each of these scenarios involves an initial enthusiasm that fades, so that the challenge remains how to hold onto that inspiration through a daily spiritual practice. The mosaic wisdom here is instructive, specifically in imparting his (Moses') spirit to the appointed seventy elders. Spiritual practice is bolstered in a community of practice where mutual trust is a given.

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's artwork depicts "the cloud of the Lord" that leads the Israelites through their years of desert wandering. "Whether it was for two days, a month, or a year, that the cloud lingered to hover over the Mishkan, the children of Israel would encamp and not travel, and when it departed, they traveled." (Numbers 9:22) Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.

Beha'alotecha -- Numbers 8:1 - 12:16

Facebook_CoverDesign_BehaalotechaCo-founder of Insight Meditation Society (IMS) in Barre, Massachusetts, Sharon Salzberg (b. 1952) once remarked:

"We can learn the art of fierce compassion -- redefining strength, deconstructing isolation, and renewing a sense of community, practicing letting go of rigid us-versus-them thinking -- while cultivating power and clarity in response to difficult situations."

How does ritual allow for the building of such community practice?

Firstly, as Aaron is commanded to light the lamps of the menorah, the focus is on just how to raise the sparks to create a luminous presence. Secondly, for those Israelites unable to bring the Paschal offering at the appointed time, there is another chance with the institution of a Second Passover. Thirdly, dissatisfaction with the manna from heaven sets in as the Israelites yearn for new tastes.

Each of these scenarios involves an initial enthusiasm that fades, so that the challenge remains how to hold onto that inspiration through a daily spiritual practice. The mosaic wisdom here is instructive, specifically in imparting his spirit to the appointed seventy elders. Spiritual practice is bolstered in a community of practice.

- Rabbi Aubrey Glazer

Artwork note: This week's artwork is an abstract depiction of Numbers 10:34: "The cloud of the Lord was above them by day, when they traveled from the camp." The "cloud" in the picture intentionally looks more like an eye or a cell, a nod to the importance of seeing/acknowledging the wondrous in the mundane. In opening ourselves to wonder, we locate G-d in a cloud (or a nucleus). Illustration by Christopher Orev Reiger.